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21 February 2013 @ 09:51 pm
A Tutu Tutorial. A Tututorial?  
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I like to make little kid tutus, and thought I would share my method for making them. Ordinarily I wouldn't bother, because it's just a dumb tutu, right?  Well, no. It's a smart tutu. I looked around the web and found hundreds of tutu tutorials, but no one was making them like this, and I don't know why. My goal in creating this tutu method was to make them FAST. I sell these at holiday craft bazaars, and the price has to be reasonable for people to actually buy them. My previous tutus were very labor intensive and thus had to have a higher price tag… and no one wanted a tutu with a price tag that reflected the amount of work put in.  No one. People don’t care. So, I needed a way to make them so quickly that I could sell them cheap and still have a fair profit. I wasn’t willing to make cheapo little crappy tutus, they had to be nice. Really nice. I wanted a tutu that was able to survive years of careless handling. It had to be reversible, so inside out didn’t matter. It had to be fluffy and tidy looking, like a real ballet tutu—not a giant snarly ball of knotted strips. It had to have a nice trim waistband that wasn’t bulky and was easy for the kid to find, grasp and dress themselves. (If you have ever seen a kid all frustrated with a messy half inside out WTF type of tutu, you know why this is important.)

Although this tutu is fast and easy to make, it is not careless. You need to pay attention to what you are doing. REALLY pay attention, so turn off Judge Judy. Tulle can get away from you and ruin your project while you are taking in the luxury to blink. There are several simple steps here aimed at eliminating possible problems and making your construction time easier. Don’t skip these steps, thinking you’ll just be careful and it won’t happen to you. It will. Trust me, I know. Please take the time to steam and press and  tape and mark and sew very straight lines. It really makes a world of difference and eliminates loads of potential frustration. I promise. Don’t be a hero.

Making this tutu is mostly tulle taming, and very little actual sewing. You only have to sew 6 straight lines and that’s about it. Really. Less than 10 minutes using the actual machines, not kidding. The rest of the time you are forcing that tulle to behave so it will slide through the machines nice and smooth without any frustration at all. Tulle can be tamed, and it can be very pleasant to work with. If you have the right tools for the job, tutu making is a piece of cake. There are a lot of little steps, but they are quickly achieved. I can make one of these tutus in about 30 minutes when I'm on a roll.

Are you ready? Here we go!

The short version, for all you smartypants seamsters who already know what's what:

Sandwich a waistband with elastic between two layers of ruffled tulle. Done.

The long version, for those who'd like a step-by-step tutorial that is very loquacious and full of too many photos:


How I make a super cute, fast, cheap, and quality sewn tutu...

Construction time:  around 30 minutes
*does not include time taken for wandering around the internet, getting sucked into an episode of Magnum PI or staring into the refridgerator… just sayin’.

Supplies used:
Soft tulle
waistband fabric
Matching thread for both sewing machine and serger
non-roll elastic, 1 inch wide
Stitch Witchery
*The amounts needed depends on the size and length you want to make! I note the amounts I'm using for a general kid sized one with the photos below.

Tools used:

Sewing machine with a ruffler foot attachment
Serger/overlock machine
Steam iron and ironing board
Cutting mat, rotary cutter and big clear quilt ruler
Duct tape (yes, really)
Large safety pin
Long straight pin

Step 0:  Prep, prep and more prep.

*Make sure your iron is the proper temperature to press and steam the tulle without melting it into a smoking crater.  Not that I’ve ever done that. *cough*cough*
*Thread up the serger with matching thread.
*Thread up the sewing machine with matching thread and full new bobbin.
*Attach ruffler foot to sewing machine.
*Brand new blade for the rotary cutter (VERY IMPORTANT, a dull blade + tulle = crazy squirrelpants lady. Not worth it.)
*Dust, sweep, mop, vacuum, wipe down everything in sight. Seriously. Tulle picks up lint and random threads and cat hair even if you don’t own a cat.

Step 1:  Steam and press  the tulle.

If you are lucky to pull  this right off a neatly rolled factory bolt, there is no need to steam and press it first. However, if you brought it home from the fabric store where a harried clerk hacked it off a manhandled stock bolt… well, yeah. Refold with selvages together, steam and press. Good as new.

Step 2: Slice up the tulle.

A cutting mat and rotary cutter make this quick and easy work. For this particular tutu, you are looking at 14 slices that are 11 inches wide, cut from a 54” bolt. You can make your width however long you'd like your tutu. You can also skip this step and just buy one of those 25 yard rolls. You are limited as to how long your tutu will be, but it does save time! (Just to be clear, each strip is 11x54 inches, and there are 14 strips total.)

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Fold them neatly, stack them and set them aside. Don’t unfold them or bunch them up or swing them around for any reason, that would be like poking a grumpy bear who was minding his own business.

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Step 4: RUFFLE ALL THE THINGS!

Make two piles of seven folded tulle slices each, to make two separate ruffles of seven sections each. I get confused easily so I have to have two piles, I can’t just count as I go along. Don’t judge me.

Get to Rufflin’.

I have my ruffler set to take a tuck with each stitch, and I have my stitch length set as small as possible, in my case it is a 0.5, whereas 2.5 is the default stitch length. This means I’m going to get a small pleat with every teensy tiny stitch, squashing 54 inches of tulle down to 6 inches in less than 30 seconds. I love it! A ruffler is what professional stage tutus are made with, and it is indeed the right tool for the job. If it takes you more than 6 minutes to permanently and evenly ruffle down a 21 yard strip of tulle, then you need to rethink your tutu making method… especially if you are making tutus to sell. Save your sanity. Buy a ruffler.

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I overlap each strip about 2 inches as I feed it into the ruffler, so it is one long continuous ruffle when I’m done. (You can kinda see what I mean in the photo below, the strip ends are overlapped before they get gobbled into the ruffler.)

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Remove the ruffler foot and replace with your regular foot.

On a flat surface gently stretch out the ruffle at the thread line. This will save your sanity later when you can’t for the life of you figure out why you have so much leftover when you already measured! Aaarrgh!

I now have two 48 inch ruffles with seven sections each. Voila. It is important to not make this ruffled strip any longer than your ironing board. It's just too much hassle when it's hanging off the edge and you have to keep moving it around.

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Step 5: Steam and press the crap out of those ruffles.

Lay ruffle #1 out on the ironing board, then finger comb it so it is more orderly and straight.

Then steam and press it until it is nice and compressed and as flat as can be, like so:

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Then flip it over and do it again to the other side, because each side of the tulle ruffle has a different personality, and they both want to stab you in the back.

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Step 6: Duct tape!

Yes,  duct tape. Gag that tulle! Tape those ruffles in place:

I used a piece of tape ¼ the length of the ruffle, and then ripped it in half lengthwise, and then in quarters, and then used it on the tulle. Only a thin strip is needed. Tape nearer to the thread line than the middle.

Don’t be a hero, TAPE BOTH SIDES. Flip it over and do it again on the other side, too.

Don’t worry, the duct tape doesn’t leave any residue and does the job well. Other tapes sucked, don’t even try them. Duct tape is king. (But, to be sure, give it a test on a scrap first!)

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Step 7 & 8: Repeat Steps 6 and 7 for Ruffle #2.

Roll up the ruffles and set by your sewing machine.

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Step 3: Prepare the waistband.

*With rotary cutter and a big clear quilt ruler,  trim the waist band fabric to 5 inches wide and however long you need the waistband to be. You are looking at a strip that has been cut to 5 X 50 inches.

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*Press it flat, and fold each end over about ¾ inch or so, pressing that again so it creases.

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*Place a small dab of Stitch Witchery in the center of the folds on either end and press/melt it in place. This is important for stringing the elastic later. You’ll thank me. No need for any more than a dot, you don’t want this little hem to be stiff at all.

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*Fold the long strip in half lengthwise (carefully and evenly!) and press with a crease

Step 9: Sew a guideline onto the waistband.

Sew the waistband closed, making sure it is perfectly straight and 1.25 inches from the fold. VERY IMPORTANT, this is your guideline and if you mess this up you will want to throw yourself off a cliff while inserting the elastic later. Essentially, you need to sew a line ¼ inch wider than the elastic you are using. I am using 1 inch elastic, so my sheath is 1.25 inches wide. Pay close attention and don’t screw it up! That line needs to be perfectly parallel and 1.25 inches from the fold at all times.

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Here you are looking at a 5X50 inch strip folded in half to a 2.5 inch width, and sewn with a guideline down the middle:

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Step 10: Add the first tulle ruffle.

This is where that guide line comes in handy. Fold the raw ruffle edge on top of itself about ½ inch or so, and then sew the ruffle down onto the waistband, lining up to the guide line and ruffle stitch line nice and neat.

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Fold the edge on top of itself at the end as well. (If you have more ruffle than waistband, trim it away about ½ inch beyond the edge of the waistband, and then fold it and complete the step.)

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Step 11: Add the second tulle ruffle.

Flip the ruffle and waistband over...

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...and attach the second ruffle using the same method, CAREFULLY lining up the stitching lines. All three stitching lines should be practically on top of each other.

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Look at all those raw edges. Let's get rid of them!

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Step 12: Overlock.

Time to make it nice and neat: I love using my serger. I have mine set to the slimmest 4 thread setting, have a stitch length of about 3, and a neutral differential.

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Trim and enclose, nice and easy. Be extra careful to follow that stitched guideline with the RIGHT needle, so that the LEFT needle is stitching just barely 1/8 inch to the left of the original guide line.

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I cannot stress enough to BE CAREFUL and mind those needle placements AT ALL TIMES. Don’t let your mind wander to LOLcats or Ryan Reynolds in his underpants, don’t even hardly blink until you are done.

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...nice and tidy, but still inside out...

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You can see why matching serger thread is important. Any contrasting thread is going to show through when flipped right side out. If you are only making a single tutu, you can just fill 4 bobbins with the matching thread you are using in your regular machine, no need to buy cone thread unless you are making a lot of them.

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Step 13: More pressing and steaming.

You might be thinking to take the tape off now, but don’t! It’s a trap! If you take it off now you’ll be dealing with a giant angry kicking caterpillar you’ll want to kill with fire.

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Flip the tutu right side out, so now you have this:

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Press and steam just the waistband and a few inches of the tulle, avoiding the tape.

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Step 14: Insert the elastic.

Prep the elastic by trimming the corners of one side and inserting the safety pin. On the other side, place the straight pin. This will keep it from disappearing inside the waistband and causing you to curse dramatically and possibly kick something.

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Snake that bastard through. If you sewed everything straight and neat, that elastic shouldn’t give you a lick of trouble. Also, YOU’RE WELCOME for the dot of Stitch Witchery placed so the elastic comes right out the other side like butter.

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Step 15: Sew the elastic.

I use a zig zag stitch and overlap about an inch. I zig zag over each raw edge to make it slide around inside the waistband easier. (usually I use white thread, but I wanted you to see what I did.)

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Step 16: Even out the ruching.

Play with it and stretch it around until it is all even, and make sure the overlapped elastic seam is lost somewhere inside.

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Step 17: Dude, you’re almost done, just one more little thing.

Find the waistband seam, flip that mother inside out and make a small overlap with the overlocked seam allowance.

Shown open:

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Shown overlapped:

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Tack it down with a zig zag on a small stitch length, only on that small seam allowance  There, now the elastic won’t show while it’s being stretched. That waistband seam is still open, but the ruching keeps it hidden. This is important, because you have easy access to that elastic inside, in case you need to make it bigger or smaller. Darn kids, always growing bigger or being smaller than you think they are.

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Step 18: Okay, NOW you can remove the tape.

Step 19: Fluff it, fluff it good.

Flip it rightside out again. Shake it out, shoot it with steam, squoogle it up with your hands. You heard me: squoogle.

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Step 20: Embellish.

Add bow or flower or whatever, right at the seam to cover where it might look a little different. Here is an example with a more pale pink tutu:

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I found that this amount of fluff was the perfect balance between fullness, ease of construction, and cost of materials. You can always make them fluffier by adding extra ruffled layers to steps 10 and 11, or you can simply make tighter gathers with extra fabric in step 4. Of course, this makes everything more expensive, time consuming and difficult due to the additional thickness, but it can be done.

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Rose pink (that did not photo well, oops) waistband made with Casa Collection satin from Joann Fabrics:

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Light pink and aqua waistbands made with Casa Collection Taffeta from Joann Fabrics:

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Purple waistband made with a nice crepe back satin:

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Ready for twirling!

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...and there you have it. It's easy to make these in an "assembly line" fashion if you are selling them or making them for a party or something. I know it seems like a lot to do, but really it's not-- each step takes less than a few minutes each. I hope you make beautiful tutus!
 
 
 
mrq_laurellenmrq_laurellen on February 22nd, 2013 06:17 am (UTC)
RUFFLE ALL THE THINGS!
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:31 pm (UTC)
Gads I love Hyperbole and a Half. The cake, the dogs, Kenny Loggins, OMG the laughs are so good. I wish she would feel better already and make more! I miss her!
ghost_ofa_roseghost_ofa_rose on February 22nd, 2013 12:30 pm (UTC)
Thanks for the tututorial ! I'm definitely going to try it this summer. My little girl will love this.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:29 pm (UTC)
You're welcome! When you do, send me a picture! I'd love to see.
katexxxxxxkatexxxxxx on February 22nd, 2013 12:36 pm (UTC)
I can see doing these as part of a bridal session... Tank you, they are a lot of fun.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:29 pm (UTC)
You're welcome! I think they look adorable in big girl sizes, too! Just remember to measure them for the upper hips, not the waist. I made that mistake, ONCE, lol.

Edited at 2013-02-22 05:32 pm (UTC)
purchasing one? - Maddy Overson on August 25th, 2013 11:32 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: purchasing one? - starlightmasque on August 26th, 2013 12:57 am (UTC) (Expand)
Katmadamekat on February 22nd, 2013 01:00 pm (UTC)
Previous to reading your tutorial, I had no desire to make a tutu. Now I want one!! It was well written and funny~ just what I need a tutorial to be! Thank you! I look forward to squoogling one day.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:27 pm (UTC)
Thanks! I'd love to see you squoogling someday, too!
Lorenbauhausfrau on February 22nd, 2013 03:23 pm (UTC)
Great tutorial! Given I have a niece I'm sure a tutu is in my future somewhere and this will be so handy to have. Added bonus - you're totally hilarious!
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:25 pm (UTC)
Thanks! Aw, the little girls love the tutus. I hope it goes easy for you!
my_stitchingmy_stitching on February 22nd, 2013 04:09 pm (UTC)
Great tutorial! Thanks for putting it together.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:24 pm (UTC)
Thank you! And, you're welcome!
the_thread_ladythe_thread_lady on February 22nd, 2013 04:27 pm (UTC)
You are tutu good!

I love the commentaries you write for your tutorials. You are such a good writer.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:24 pm (UTC)
Thanks! I just blurt it all out there. I'm so classy.
centuriessewingcenturiessewing on February 22nd, 2013 05:08 pm (UTC)
The one with the bow killlllls me with the cuteness, it burns it burns!
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:23 pm (UTC)
I know! Soooooo cute!
Elizabethashamanja_babu on February 22nd, 2013 05:14 pm (UTC)
So, you don't ever seam the tulle? That split is left open?
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 05:23 pm (UTC)
Yep, there is a split in between each of the 14 panels-- and they are invisible when they are all ruffled and ruched up on the waistband. You can only find them if you dig in and pull them apart-- the raw edges like to "stick" to each other, and they are slightly overlapped, which helps the invisibility.
Tutu - Mercia Horne on August 23rd, 2015 10:49 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Tutu - starlightmasque on August 23rd, 2015 02:25 pm (UTC) (Expand)
virginiadear: LaBellavirginiadear on February 22nd, 2013 06:46 pm (UTC)
Wonderful! These look like great fun! :-)

Thanks for sharing so generously!
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 22nd, 2013 07:06 pm (UTC)
Thank you! You're welcome!
Margo! Boxcar! Saturn!: e. st v. millaychocolatepot on February 23rd, 2013 01:37 am (UTC)
I'm not planning on making tutus anytime soon (although who knows!), but this is a really, really well done tutorial!
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 23rd, 2013 02:59 am (UTC)
Thank you! I find most tutorials lacking so I usually overkill mine with pictures and "dumb" instructions like: Flip it over. Remove tape. Scratch nose. Call your mother. :)
Hastings Sanderson on February 23rd, 2013 04:45 am (UTC)
My girls need some of these (which means my boys will demand some too.) Now to decide how ambitious I am since my ruffler belongs to the antique Singer I have in storage. :)
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 23rd, 2013 05:04 am (UTC)
I don't know what to say about boys wanting tutus.

EXCEPT THIS:

 photo tutus99_zps7f4c0aa5.jpg

(Yeah, that's my son and his buds goofing around with my scraps and cast offs. I have hundreds of pictures like this. Just anticipating a future blackmailing, I guess.)

Edited at 2013-02-23 05:05 am (UTC)
(no subject) - izodiea on February 25th, 2013 07:55 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - starlightmasque on February 26th, 2013 02:09 am (UTC) (Expand)
Ashley FesslerAshley Fessler on March 25th, 2013 03:59 am (UTC)
No serger - maybe a side-cutter presser foot instead?
In light of wanting to be as cost-effective as possible, it is not in the budget to invest in a serger at the moment (although I'm telepathically sending those messages to my husband as I type this). Anyhow, do you have any great tips on how to finish those raw edges without the use of such a grand machine? Any thoughts on a side-cutter presser foot attachment? ($30 vs. $300) This may be a great alternative for all the rest of us reading this tutorial thinking how in the heck we're going to complete that raw edge step.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on March 25th, 2013 02:08 pm (UTC)
Re: No serger - maybe a side-cutter presser foot instead?
Hi Ashley! I've never used one of those feet, but it sounds good. My only worry would be how thick and inconsistent the raw edge is, and maybe the foot couldn't handle it? I don't know. I think an even cheaper method would be to just trim it down and bias bind the raw edge with as close a color as you could find, maybe even the same fabric as the waistband. I know that would work!

Thank you for reading my tutorial!
Genevieve GordonGenevieve Gordon on July 12th, 2013 11:46 am (UTC)
Sizing
What a fabulous tutorial! Any suggestions on how I should change the dimensions of the material for a size 4 tutu, the waist measurement of the little girl is 49cm. I understand the length that is not an issue but do I add some more panels to ensure fullness? Thanks
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on July 12th, 2013 02:44 pm (UTC)
Re: Sizing
Hi Genevieve! Thank you!

If you want to add more panels, make sure you stack them, instead of connecting them end to end-- end to end would work, but would be very unweildy. I think it would be easier to follow the instuctions above, and ruffling double layers of tulle instead of single. I haven't actually tried to ruffle a double layer, I assume that works. If it doesn't, stack two ruffled layers on either side of the waistband. The thickness will make it more difficult to work with, and make a fatter waistband, but you will get a lot more fullness.

I hope that works out for you! Post a picture if you can, I'd love to see!

Edit: her waist size corresponmds to what I made above, just make sure the elastic is comfortable around her waist; the gathering density of the waistband will cover a wide variety of waist sizes. The elastic inside is what makes it fit properly.

Edited at 2013-07-12 02:52 pm (UTC)
Re: Sizing - starlightmasque on July 12th, 2013 02:47 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Sizing - Genevieve Gordon on July 18th, 2013 06:19 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Sizing - starlightmasque on July 18th, 2013 02:29 pm (UTC) (Expand)
ext_2071101 on July 18th, 2013 09:58 am (UTC)
tutu
I LOVE YOU. That's all.
I'm supposed to make 7 tutus in 2 days for Race for the Cure here in Cambridge,England and this tutorial has allowed me to look magnific ...(5 done 2 to go..) You are a genius. End of story. :)
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on July 18th, 2013 02:20 pm (UTC)
Re: tutu
Oh, ha! ha! Wonderful! Thank you! I hope you have an awesome race! Post a photo if you can!
Natalie AdamsZevasMaMa on October 18th, 2013 02:10 pm (UTC)
What I have been searching for!!
Thank you so much for creating this tutorial and posting - I am a seamstress but sometimes (especially with a two year old in the house) I have a hard time picturing how to put a project together. I made the ruffles last night, and the tape is the greatest tip EVER :-) Thank you, thank you, thank you!!
I am making this for her (my soon to be 2 year old) birthday on Sunday.

starlightmasquestarlightmasque on October 19th, 2013 05:54 am (UTC)
Re: What I have been searching for!!
Thank you! And, you're welcome! I hope it turns out perfectly and your little darling loves it! Have fun!
lizzee26 on November 2nd, 2013 04:33 pm (UTC)
Tutu
Thank you for a fab tutorial - You made it sound nice and simple - I actually bought a digital pattern for an apron and the woman that wrote it might have been writing in double dutch - she made a simple pattern sound very difficult - Never mind glad I found yours - I want to make a big girl tutu - what did you mean measure them from the hips?
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on November 2nd, 2013 06:42 pm (UTC)
Re: Tutu
Hi Lizzee! Thank you so much for the compliments! I like stuff that is really really explained to make it simple, glad you found it useful!

Well, an adult tutu looks super stupid when it sits around the natural waist-- with little girls it's no biggee, but on big girls-- no. So, the tutu sits very low on the waist, high on the hips, that looks so much better! (It's where professional ballerina tutus sit-- maybe google a few photos to see what I mean?)

Good luck and have fun!



Melissa Casebere on November 17th, 2013 01:02 am (UTC)
waistband fabric
What did you use for waistband fabric?
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on November 17th, 2013 01:55 am (UTC)
Re: waistband fabric
Hi Melissa! I used satin or taffeta in what you see above, but any non-knit/non-stretchy fabric that matches should work fine. I preferred the taffeta, it was easy to work with and looked nice.
Candi MannCandi Mann on December 10th, 2013 07:45 pm (UTC)
Ruffler Jamming
Thank you for this great tutorial! I am almost done making my tutu and it looks great! But,I had a problem with the tulle jamming in the ruffler. I tried covering the pointy feet with tape(per a suggestion on another website), but it didn't help. Have you ever had that problem? If so, what did you do to keep the tulle from jamming?

Thank you!

Candi
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on December 10th, 2013 10:35 pm (UTC)
Re: Ruffler Jamming
Hi Candi! Thank you! And, you're welcome!

I wish I could help you, but I don't think I can. I don't recall anything jamming up... maybe you just need to go slowly? Gently tug from behind to keep the ruffled part from getting hooked on anything as it feeds through?

I don't know! I hope you figure it out, how frustrating!
Re: Ruffler Jamming - Candi Mann on December 11th, 2013 02:17 am (UTC) (Expand)
Marne Harris FrenchMarne Harris French on January 12th, 2014 04:59 am (UTC)
Adult Conversion
Hi! I've been searching all over the internet for tutu tutorials and I learn best by photos. My mom and I are going to Disney to run the Princess Half Marathon and 10k in February. I totally think that I can do this! (or at least that's what I've convinced myself) A few questions for you. 1. How many sections do you think an adult tutu would need? 2. I don't have a serger....any suggestions? and 3. What kind of foot did you change to when sewing the satin? I won't say I'm a novice at sewing but lets just say I can manage some things, like this project, I think. Any help or advice you could give me would be greatly appreciated!

Marne French
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on January 12th, 2014 05:57 am (UTC)
Re: Adult Conversion
Mi Marne! How super fun to wear a tutu for a Princess Run!

For an adult tutu, I would think about 1 strips per inch would be about right? (Remember to measure upper hips, not actual natural waistline) So, if it is 30 inches, I would think 30 sections would look nice. The kid tutus above are about 18 inches, using 14 sections-- so a little less than 1 per inch, but they could always stand to be fluffier for a princess run! My answer would be .75 to 1 section per inch-- but it is very flexible!

Instead of a serger, you can make a slim little bias binding on the raw edge, after you clip it down to neaten it. Alternately, you can just leave the edges raw. It will be hidden inside, and if you are just going for a fun run and don't care if there are a few raw edges, I don't see how it would hurt anything. You could clip the edge neat and short and just let it be.

I just used a regular foot for the satin, nothing special!

I hope you have fun! Post a picture if you feel like it!



Re: Adult Conversion - Marne Harris French on January 12th, 2014 06:33 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - starlightmasque on January 12th, 2014 06:59 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - jamiearruda on May 17th, 2015 05:04 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - starlightmasque on May 17th, 2015 05:15 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - starlightmasque on January 12th, 2014 07:01 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - starlightmasque on January 12th, 2014 07:02 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - Marne Harris French on January 12th, 2014 07:08 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - starlightmasque on January 12th, 2014 05:28 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - jackson0912 on March 31st, 2014 05:28 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - starlightmasque on March 31st, 2014 06:02 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Adult Conversion - starlightmasque on March 31st, 2014 07:34 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Natalie TotskaNatalie Totska on January 24th, 2014 05:30 pm (UTC)
Dear Angela,
thank you very much for your tutorial. It's awesome!!! I've just made one pink tutu and I'm so happy! Thank you again and again.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on January 24th, 2014 08:06 pm (UTC)
You are welcome! Glad to help!
Kim Hand on January 28th, 2014 07:21 am (UTC)
Tutu!
Thank you so much for your tutorial. The following link is a picture of my granddaughter in her Halloween costume. My daughter was so happy with how it turned out that she ask me to make one for her first birthday. I've almost completed her a pale pink tutu. I'll send you a pic of that as well in a few days! I just love your easy to follow instructions and the method you use in constructing the tutu. It looks so professional and yet it's so simple. So sweet of you to share! ~Kim
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10202435056661749&set=a.3401337516239.2163150.1353861884&type=1
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 19th, 2014 01:21 am (UTC)
Re: Tutu!
Goodness, that is the CUTEST EVER!!!! Thank you so much for sharing that darling picture!
Michelle Garcia OrenseMichelle Garcia Orense on February 18th, 2014 11:45 pm (UTC)
thank's note
loving your tutorial.
a big big thanks.
salamat po
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on February 19th, 2014 01:24 am (UTC)
Re: thank's note
Walang anuman! I'm glad you liked it!
Jody E on March 14th, 2014 03:14 pm (UTC)
Thank you so much!
Thank you so much for being the lone tutorial on the internet for a sewn tutu that makes sense.
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on March 14th, 2014 10:40 pm (UTC)
Re: Thank you so much!
You are welcome! Thanks for saying so! I scoured the internet for a good tutu tuorial, and came up with bupkiss. Had to make one myself!
Sandy Holder-TouchtonSandy Holder-Touchton on April 1st, 2014 03:41 am (UTC)
Do you make adult sizes?
Your tutus look great! Do you make them for adults? I have a couple of running buddies and we were planning to purchase some from a lady who now has so many orders she can't take anymore. We have a run on April 13th - I really don't have the desire, time or sewing machine to make my own. If you are interested in making three ladies sizes please let me know...also what would charge for them? Thanks!!
starlightmasquestarlightmasque on April 1st, 2014 04:13 am (UTC)
Re: Do you make adult sizes?
Hi Sandy! Thank you so much! Unfortunately, I am not making tutus currently, I am knee-deep in 18th century commissions.

Thanks for asking, I appreciate you thinking of me! I hope you are able to find a tutu maker, and I hope your run is awesome!